Getting Started... - Old & New Testament Reading Plan

For those who like to read the Old Testament and New Testament together, this schedule permits you to read an Old Testament passage and a New Testament passage at one sitting each day.

Your knowledge of the Old Testament will be enhanced by what you read simultaneously in the New Testament.

Click on "MONTH 1" below to reveal the first set of readings.

We look forward to your comments and questions below!

If you found value in this post, please share your comments, questions, and prayers with us!
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16 days ago
Love the way the O T inhances the freshness of the N T
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a month ago
Can I get pdf files of reading the OT & NT in 1 year & of just the NT in 1 year as well to share with my congregation?
1 reply
15 days ago
Hi Pastor Leonard! I sent this to your e-mail. ENJOY!
4 months ago
Awesome site! Can I get a pdf of the OT/NT plan as well as the Historical? Thanks!
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1 reply
4 months ago
Thanks Shannon! Here you go - ENJOY!
pdf
OT & NT Bible Reading Guide.pdf
107.96 KB
pdf
Historical Bible Reading Guide.pdf
102.94 KB
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4 months ago
I just started the O.T./ N.T. reading plan. Questions ; Genesis 1:14 describing stars ? Then if that's correct then Genesis 1: 16 is reaffirming; "He made the stars also" Now what I just typed is from the the MacArthur study bible. But in my authorized King James it's "he made the stars also" , shouldn't it be ; He made the stars also since He is relating to God ?
Also Genesis 1:26 - 28, is that pre Adam and eve ?
1 reply
4 months ago
Hi Clif - Good question. You’re correct that Genesis 1:16 is referring to God as the creator of the stars. But it is also written correctly in your Bible as “he made the stars also.”

Capitalizing pronouns referring to God (divine pronouns) is actually a fairly recent practice in writing that seems to have become more popular with the development of modern printing technologies in the 300-400 years. In fact, this practice didn’t start becoming commonplace until AFTER the KJV was published in 1611 which is why “he” and other divine pronouns are not capitalized in the KLV translation of the Bible

Today, maybe Bible translations choose NOT to capitalize divine pronouns. Though you’d have to check the translation notes of those Bibles (often included at the start of a Bible) to see if the translators explained their choice. The NASB and NKJV are two popular translations which DO capitalize pronouns referring to God.

At Back to the Bible we’ve chosen to capitalize divine pronouns in our own writing, though, we will always quote the Scriptures exactly. Other organizations are free to choose their own position on divine pronouns.

As to your other question: Genesis 1:1 – 2:4 provides a high-level overview of the creation week including the creation of humanity (Adam and Eve). Then in Genesis 2:5 onward, the focus shifts to a much more close up view of creation. So you’ll see some things mentioned a second time in Genesis 2—this time in more detail.
6 months ago
I would like a printed copy of this one and the Historical can you do that?
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1 reply
6 months ago
I just sent them to you in an e-mail - enjoy!
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